How to Convert an Expired JAR Licence to an EASA Licence

JAR to EASA Licence Conversion

EASA Licence Conversion

Now that the EASA regulations have been fully implemented, I am getting enquiries from worried pilots who have let both their helicopter type rating and their licence expire. The old JAR licence needed to be renewed every 5 years. The new EASA Licence (more correctly referred to as a PART-FCL licence) has no expiry date.

The literature relating to renewing an expired licence is difficult to find in the Part-FCL document but after trawling through the relevant documents and with some help from Simon White in the IAA, I was able to get the correct information.

First of all, there is no need to panic or worry if your old JAR licence has expired. It is a relatively simple process to renew it. Anyone wishing to renew an expired JAR license to EASA license should ensure that they do the following (this applies to PPL(H) only – I have not researched the CPL(H) yet):

  • Have a current Class 1 or Class 2 medical certificate
  • Have passed the English Language Proficiency (ELP) test and reached a level of at least level 4.
  • Complete the requirements to renew any helicopter type rating (a licence cannot be issued without a type rating). Refer to my previous post “Renewing an Expired EASA Type Rating
  • In Ireland – complete the application form www.iaa.ie/media/ApplicationfortheRe-Issue1.pdf
  • Pass the oral and flight skill test

On successful completion of the above, the Authority (IAA in Ireland) will issue an EASA Licence.

Note that there is no longer a requirement for a Type Rating written exam. The examiner will test applicants verbally before the flight test. You will still be required to have the necessary technical knowledge before the examiner will issue a pass.

 


Print Friendly

Passing the Oral Test for the PPL

PPL Oral Test

I have been getting requests from many people looking for advice on what kind of questions come up during the oral test for the PPL. Examiners are required to test a student’s knowledge and for many, this can be the most stressful part of the testing process.

As part of the flight test, the examiner is required to orally test the student. The examiner will ask many questions on many different subjects to find out if the student has any glaringly obvious gaps in their knowledge. EASA PPL Requirements can be found here.

Request For Information From My Readers

I am in the process of gathering up information to make the oral test easier for students. This will apply to pilots who are being tested anywhere in the world. In order to help me obtain a database of the kinds of questions that an examiner might ask, I am asking you to send me any details you can remember about your oral test. If you can remember the questions that you were asked (especially the questions that you found difficult to answer) then these questions will help to make it easier for new students undergoing testing.

By using the “CONTACT” button to the right of the screen, you can leave me a message or just write in the questions that you were asked. I get many visitors to this site from the USA and Europe. I would like you all to think of the questions that you were asked and send them through to me. Send me any material relating to the PPL for Fixed Wing, Rotary, Balloon, Glider, Microlight and anything else that you can think of (as long as it relates to the PPL).

This knowledge will be useful to everyone and if I get enough data, I will make a separate post that will make the questions available to everyone.

Many Thanks

John.

Print Friendly

Convert FAA License to European Part-FCL License

EASA Logo

Convert FAA PPL/CPL/ATPL to EASA PPL

This post applies to anyone who has an ICAO helicopter license with a minimum of 100 hours flight time as a pilot. If you need to convert the ICAO licence to an EASA Part-FCL PPL license, this post will explain what is required. The new European license is commonly called an EASA licence but this is incorrect – its correct name is a ‘Part-FCL’ licence.

FAA pilot licenses are in use all over the world today. Air laws and air space vary from country to country, therefore many countries require conversion of licenses to make sure pilots are familiar and comply with local laws, procedures, airspace, etc. Many countries with high demand for pilots accept FAA licenses without any need for conversion.

If you are planning on flying in European airspace, you will be required to convert your FAA pilot license to an EASA (Part-FCL) pilot license. EASA stands for European Aviation Safety Agency, and is the centrepiece of the European Union’s strategy for aviation safety.

First of all, if you do not have at least 100 hours as a pilot in helicopters, it is going to be very expensive to convert and you will have to do a lot more flying. If you have 100 hours as a pilot then the following conversion process applies. All of this information is available in EASA document ‘Commission Regulation (EU) No 1178/2011‘. Annex I of this document is known as Part-FCL and deals with everything in relation to Flight Crew Licensing.

The requirements for converting an ICAO PPL(H), CPL(H) or ATPL(H) to a Part-FCL PPL(H) are as follows:

  • Have completed at least 100 hours of flight time as a pilot.
  • Apply to the Competent Authority of the State/Country in which you wish to train.
  • Pass an English Language Proficiency (ELP) oral examination (there are no exceptions to this).
  • Hold either a class 1 or a class 2 medical certificate.
  • Complete a type rating on the helicopter you are going to be tested on. Normally, the type rating course will be of 5 hours duration.
  • Pass the Air Law and Human Performance written examinations (multiple choice).
  • Pass the PPL(H) Skill Test.

On completion of the above, you will be issued with a Part-FCL licence.

Convert FAA CPL/ATPL to EASA CPL

The requirements for converting an ICAO CPL(H) or ATPL(H) to a Part-FCL CPL(H) are as follows:

  • Apply to the Competent Authority of the State/Country in which you wish to train.
  • Have completed 155 hours flight time as a pilot in helicopters, including 50 hours as PIC of which 10 hours shall be cross-country (105 hours as pilot in helicopters if holder of a CPL(A), 135 hours as pilot in helicopters if holder of a PPL(A).
  • If not already holding a night qualification or rating, have completed 5 hours night flight time.
  • Pass all of the Theoretical Knowledge exams for either the CPL(H) or ATPL(H). These exams are explained in greater detail at http://helicopterblog.com/?p=733.
  • Flight training as required by the Head of Training of the training organisation. This will require an assessment flight before training commences.
  • Pass an English Language Proficiency (ELP) oral examination (there are no exceptions to this).
  • Hold a class 1 medical certificate.
  • Pass the CPL(H) Skill Test

Remember that all of the training (both flight and theoretical knowledge training) must be completed at an Approved Training Organisation (ATO). The Competent Authority in the country that you intend to train should have a list of all ATOs.

Print Friendly

Theoretical Knowledge Syllabus For CPL, ATPL and IR

I have duplicated the EASA syllabus. This theoretical knowledge syllabus is the current one at time of publication. Anyone planning to sit the theoretical knowledge subjects for the EASA exams will need to complete a course at an Approved Training Organisation (ATO) covering the syllabus described in the table below.

Refer to EASA documents AMC1 FCL.310; FCL.515 (b); FCL.615 (b)
SYLLABUS OF THEORETICAL KNOWLEDGE FOR THE ATPL, CPL AND IR
The following table contains the detailed theoretical knowledge syllabus for the ATPL, CPL and IR.
The applicable items for each licence or rating are marked with ‘x’.

 
 
Aeroplane
Aeroplane
Helicopter
Helicopter
Helicopter
 
ATPLCPLATPL/IRATPLCPLIR
010 00 00 00AIR LAW AND ATC PROCEDURESXXXXXX
010 01 00 00INTERNATIONAL LAW: CONVENTIONS, AGREEMENTS AND ORGANISATIONSXXXXXX
010 02 00 00AIRWORTHINESS OF AIRCRAFTXXXXXX
010 03 00 00AIRCRAFT NATIONALITY AND REGISTRATION MARKSXXXXXX
010 04 00 00PERSONNEL LICENSINGXXXXXX
010 05 00 00RULES OF THE AIRXXXXXX
010 06 00 00PROCEDURES FOR AIR NAVIGATION SERVICES: AIRCRAFT OPERATIONSXXXXXX
010 07 00 00AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES AND AIR TRAFFIC MANAGEMENTXXXXXX
010 08 00 00AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION SERVICEXXXXXX
010 09 00 00AERODROMES OR HELIPORTSXXXXXX
010 10 00 00FACILITATIONXXXXXX
010 11 00 00SEARCH AND RESCUEXXXXXX
010 12 00 00SECURITYXXXXXX
010 13 00 00AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT INVESTIGATIONXXXXXX
021 00 00 00AIRCRAFT GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: AIRFRAME AND SYSTEMS, ELECTRICS, POWERPLANT AND EMERGENCY EQUIPMENTXXXXXX
021 01 00 00SYSTEM DESIGN, LOADS, STRESSES AND MAINTENANCEXXXXXX
021 02 00 00AIRFRAMEXXXXXX
021 03 00 00HYDRAULICSXXXXXX
021 04 00 00LANDING GEAR, WHEELS, TYRES AND BRAKESXXXXXX
021 05 00 00FLIGHT CONTROLSXXXXXX
021 06 00 00PNEUMATICS: PRESSURISATION AND AIR CONDITIONINGXXXXXX
021 07 00 00ANTI AND DE-ICING SYSTEMSXXXXXX
021 08 00 00FUEL SYSTEMXXXXXX
021 09 00 00ELECTRICSXXXXXX
021 10 00 00PISTON ENGINESXXXXXX
021 11 00 00TURBINE ENGINESXXXXXX
021 12 00 00PROTECTION AND DETECTION SYSTEMSXXXXXX
021 13 00 00OXYGEN SYSTEMSXXXXXX
021 14 00 00HELICOPTER: MISCELLANEOUS SYSTEMSXXXXXX
021 15 00 00HELICOPTER: ROTOR HEADSXXXXXX
021 16 00 00HELICOPTER: TRANSMISSIONXXXXXX
021 17 00 00HELICOPTER: BLADESXXXXXX
022 00 00 00AIRCRAFT GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: INSTRUMENTATIONXXXXXX
022 01 00 00SENSORS AND INSTRUMENTSXXXXXX
022 02 00 00MEASUREMENT OF AIR DATA PARAMETERSXXXXXX
022 03 00 00MAGNETISM: DIRECT READING COMPASS AND FLUX VALVEXXXXXX
022 04 00 00GYROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTSXXXXXX
022 05 00 00INERTIAL NAVIGATION AND REFERENCE SYSTEMSXXXXXX
022 06 00 00AEROPLANE: AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMSXXXXXX
022 07 00 00HELICOPTER: AUTOMATIC FLIGHT CONTROL SYSTEMSXXXXXX
022 08 00 00TRIMS, YAW DAMPER AND FLIGHT ENVELOPE PROTECTIONXXXXXX
022 09 00 00AUTOTHROTTLE: AUTOMATIC THRUST CONTROL SYSTEMXXXXXX
022 10 00 00COMMUNICATION SYSTEMSXXXXXX
022 11 00 00FMSXXXXXX
022 12 00 00ALERTING SYSTEMS AND PROXIMITY SYSTEMSXXXXXX
022 13 00 00INTEGRATED INSTRUMENTS: ELECTRONIC DISPLAYSXXXXXX
022 14 00 00MAINTENANCE, MONITORING AND RECORDING SYSTEMSXXXXXX
022 15 00 00DIGITAL CIRCUITS AND COMPUTERSXXXXXX
030 00 00 00FLIGHT PERFORMANCE AND PLANNINGXXXXX
031 00 00 00MASS AND BALANCE: AEROPLANES OR HELICOPTERSXXXXX
031 01 00 00PURPOSE OF MASS AND BALANCE CONSIDERATIONSXXXXX
031 02 00 00LOADINGXXXXX
031 03 00 00FUNDAMENTALS OF CG CALCULATIONSXXXXX
031 04 00 00MASS AND BALANCE DETAILS OF AIRCRAFTXXXXX
031 05 00 00DETERMINATION OF CG POSITIONXXXXX
031 06 00 00CARGO HANDLINGXXXXX
032 00 00 00PERFORMANCE: AEROPLANESXX
032 01 00 00GENERALXX
032 02 00 00PERFORMANCE CLASS B: SE AEROPLANESXX
032 03 00 00PERFORMANCE CLASS B: ME AEROPLANESXX
032 04 00 00PERFORMANCE CLASS A : AEROPLANES CERTIFICATED UNDER CS-25 ONLYXX
033 00 00 00FLIGHT PLANNING AND FLIGHT MONITORINGXXXXXX
033 01 00 00FLIGHT PLANNING FOR VFR FLIGHTSXXXXXX
033 02 00 00FLIGHT PLANNING FOR IFR FLIGHTSXXXXXX
033 03 00 00FUEL PLANNINGXXXXXX
033 04 00 00PRE-FLIGHT PREPARATIONXXXXXX
033 05 00 00ATS FLIGHT PLANXXXXXX
033 06 00 00FLIGHT MONITORING AND IN-FLIGHT RE-PLANNINGXXXXXX
034 00 00 00PERFORMANCE: HELICOPTERSXXX
034 01 00 00GENERALXXX
034 02 00 00PERFORMANCE CLASS 3 SE HELICOPTERS ONLYXXX
034 03 00 00PERFORMANCE CLASS 2XXX
034 04 00 00PERFORMANCE CLASS 1 HELICOPTERS CERTIFICATED UNDER CS 29 ONLYXXX
040 00 00 00HUMAN PERFORMANCEXXXXXX
040 01 00 00HUMAN FACTORS: BASIC CONCEPTSXXXXXX
040 02 00 00BASIC AVIATION PHYSIOLOGY AND HEALTH MAINTENANCEXXXXXX
040 03 00 00BASIC AVIATION PSYCHOLOGYXXXXXX
050 00 00 00METEOROLOGYXXXXXX
050 01 00 00THE ATMOSPHEREXXXXXX
050 02 00 00WINDXXXXXX
050 03 00 00THERMODYNAMICSXXXXXX
050 04 00 00CLOUDS AND FOGXXXXXX
050 05 00 00PRECIPITATIONXXXXXX
050 06 00 00AIR MASSES AND FRONTSXXXXXX
050 07 00 00PRESSURE SYSTEMSXXXXXX
050 08 00 00CLIMATOLOGYXXXXXX
050 09 00 00FLIGHT HAZARDSXXXXXX
050 10 00 00METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATIONXXXXXX
060 00 00 00NAVIGATIONXXXXXX
061 00 00 00GENERAL NAVIGATIONXXXXXX
061 01 00 00BASICS OF NAVIGATIONXXXXXX
061 02 00 00MAGNETISM AND COMPASSESXXXXXX
061 03 00 00CHARTSXXXXXX
061 04 00 00DEAD RECKONING NAVIGATIONXXXXXX
061 05 00 00IN-FLIGHT NAVIGATIONXXXXXX
062 00 00 00RADIO NAVIGATIONXXXXXX
062 01 00 00BASIC RADIO PROPAGATION THEORYXXXXXX
062 02 00 00RADIO AIDSXXXXXX
062 03 00 00RADARXXXXXX
062 04 00 00INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANKXXXXXX
062 05 00 00AREA NAVIGATION SYSTEMS AND RNAV OR FMSXXXXXX
062 06 00 00GNSSXXXXXX
070 00 00 00OPERATIONAL PROCEDURESXXXXX
071 01 00 00GENERAL REQUIREMENTSXXXXX
071 02 00 00SPECIAL OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES AND HAZARDS (GENERAL ASPECTS)XXXXX
071 03 00 00HELICOPTER EMERGENCY PROCEDURESXXXXX
080 00 00 00PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHTXXXXX
081 00 00 00PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHT: AEROPLANEXX
081 01 00 00SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICSXX
081 02 00 00HIGH SPEED AERODYNAMICSXX
081 03 00 00INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANKXX
081 04 00 00STABILITYXX
081 05 00 00CONTROLXX
081 06 00 00LIMITATIONSXX
081 07 00 00PROPELLERSXX
081 08 00 00FLIGHT MECHANICSXX
082 00 00 00PRINCIPLES OF FLIGHT: HELICOPTERXXX
082 01 00 00SUBSONIC AERODYNAMICSXXX
082 02 00 00TRANSONIC AERODYNAMICS AND COMPRESSIBILITY EFFECTSXXX
082 03 00 00ROTORCRAFT TYPESXXX
082 04 00 00MAIN ROTOR AERODYNAMICSXXX
082 05 00 00MAIN ROTOR MECHANICSXXX
082 06 00 00TAIL ROTORSXXX
082 07 00 00EQUILIBRIUM, STABILITY AND CONTROLXXX
082 08 00 00HELICOPTER FLIGHT MECHANICSXXX
090 00 00 00COMMUNICATIONSXXXXXX
091 00 00 00VFR COMMUNICATIONSXXXXXX
091 01 00 00DEFINITIONSXXXXXX
091 02 00 00GENERAL OPERATING PROCEDURESXXXXXX
091 03 00 00RELEVANT WEATHER INFORMATION TERMS (VFR)XXXXXX
091 04 00 00ACTION REQUIRED TO BE TAKEN IN CASE OF COMMUNICATION FAILUREXXXXXX
091 05 00 00DISTRESS AND URGENCY PROCEDURESXXXXXX
091 06 00 00GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF VHF PROPAGATION AND ALLOCATION OF FREQUENCIESXXXXXX
092 00 00 00IFR COMMUNICATIONSXX
092 01 00 00DEFINITIONSXX
092 02 00 00GENERAL OPERATING PROCEDURESXX
092 03 00 00ACTION REQUIRED TO BE TAKEN IN CASE OF COMMUNICATION FAILUREXX
092 04 00 00DISTRESS AND URGENCY PROCEDURESXX
092 05 00 00RELEVANT WEATHER INFORMATION TERMS (IFR)XX
092 06 00 00GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF VHF PROPAGATION AND ALLOCATION OF FREQUENCIESXX
092 07 00 00MORSE CODEXX

Print Friendly

Renewing an Expired EASA Type Rating

If you have let your helicopter type rating lapse – i.e. you forgot to do the annual License Proficiency Check (LPC) on time; then you will have to renew the rating before you can fly as PIC. Under EASA regulations this is quite practical and very straight forward.

The amount of training you will be required to do depends on three factors:

  • Your experience.
  • How long the type rating has lapsed
  • The complexity of the aircraft

The requirements are all explained in EASA Document PART FCL Acceptable Means of Compliance AMC1 FCL.740(b)(1).

If the type rating has lapsed, you will have to do refresher training at an Approved Training Organisation (ATO). The objective of the training is to reach the proficiency necessary to safely operate the relevant type or class of aircraft.

To determine your experience, the ATO will evaluate your log book and , if necessary, conduct a test in a Flight Simulation Training Device (FSTD)

The amount of time lapsed since the expiry of the validity period of the rating is the most influential variable here for most people. The amount of training needed to reach the desired level of proficiency will increase with the time lapsed. In some cases, after evaluating the pilot, and when the time lapsed is very limited (less than 3 months) the ATO may even determine that no further refresther training is necessary. When determining the needs of the pilot, the following items will be taken into consideration:

  • Expiry shorter than 3 months: no supplementary requirements
  • Expiry longer than 3 months but less than 1 year: a minimum of 2 training sessions
  • Expiry longer than 1 year but less than 3 years: a minimum of 3 training sessions in which the most important malfunctions in the available systems are covered
  • Expiry longer than 3 years: the pilot should undergo the training required for the initial issue of the rating or, in case of helicopter, the training required for the ‘additional type issue’, according to other valid ratings held.

Once the ATO has determined the needs of the pilot, it will develop an individual training programme that should be based on the initial training for the issue of the rating and focus on the aspects where the applicant has shown the greatest needs.

After successful completion of the training, the ATO will issue a certificate or other documental evidence that the training has been successfully achieved to the pilot. This will be submitted to the relevant Authority when applying for the type rating renewal. The certificate or other documental evidence must contain a description of the training programme.

On successful completion of a License Skills Test (LST) the pilot must then wait for the  type rating to be renewed on their license before flying as PIC.

Print Friendly