Passing the EASA Flight Test and EASA Oral Test

Updated on 11th August,2016

EASA Skill Test Book CoverThe EASA Skill Test

When a PPL student finishes their training the instructor has to prepare them for the EASA PPL skill test. The skill test involves a flight test and an oral test. As a student, you must pass both of these.

The oral test is normally completed before the flight test and is part of the flight test process. Any students that fail the oral test will not be permitted to take the flight test and the test will be deemed as a ‘FAIL.’

The oral test can take anywhere from one to two hours to complete. The examiner is not going to try and trick you with nasty, tricky questions. He/she is only trying to determine if you have the minimum amount of knowledge to fly safely. This knowledge will have been taught as part of the training syllabus.

Under exam pressure, students often forget things that they have learned in the past. An examiner will appreciate that you are under a lot of stress and will take this into account. You are not expected to know all the answers but the examiner will try to help you to recall the information or at the very least, expect you to know where to find the information relating to any questions asked.

On satisfactory completion of the oral test, the flight test can commence. You will be given time to plan a route provided by the examiner. You will be expected to fly the route and also perform an en route diversion. Also during the flight, the examiner will ask you to perform standard and emergency flight manoeuvres.

On completion of the flight test, the examiner will normally not inform you if you have passed until after the debrief. It is possible to have a partial pass, in which case a retest of the failed flight test items is required. We will discuss this in more detail later.

With all of the above in mind, I have written a book that is aimed at making the EASA skill test easier to pass. The book goes through the psychology of the test and things that you can do to relieve the stress of the test. It also gives a detailed description of what you should have covered in the PPL syllabus and what exactly you will be required to do during the flight test.

The book is aimed at PPL students for helicopters, aeroplanes and airships. There are over 350 sample oral questions for each of these categories but the air law is slightly different and is tailored to the Irish pilot so a few of the air law questions may not apply in other European countries. With 170 pages of information relating to the skill test, this book is the ideal preparation for the skill test.


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